Tag Archives: Cantor Set

Fractals & Chaos Recap for 9/11

We finished our discussion about the Cantor Set, noting that infinite set of endpoints that are left over with each segment removal are countably infinite. If the claim is that the cantor set is actually uncountable, that requires there to be other elements of the set that are not segment endpoints. And there are such points, uncountably infinitely many of them. See this post for more information on how this works.

We went on to draw a picture of the Koch Snowflake, a figure devised by Swedish mathematician Helge von Koch as an example of a continuous curve with no tangents. As the fractalization process continues, the number of segments that make its perimeter increases without bound, but the length of each segment shrinks to zero. Mathematically, however, the total perimeter also increases, resulting in a figure with finite area and infinite perimeter!

We ended the period by starting to draw an image of another fractal, called the Sierpinski Triangle. Start with an equilateral triangle (connect the dots in the worksheet), then bisect and connect all three sides. Fill in that middle triangle, effectively removing it and leaving you with three triangles at the three corners. Then do that process again for each of the three triangles: bisect the sides, connect them, and fill in the middle triangle. Do that as many steps as you can fit. Don’t cheat and look up what the final result looks like!

Mathematical Musing: The Cantor Set is Uncountably Infinite: A Proof

This post is intended for my Fractals and Chaos students. Other students may find it interesting, but in order to understand its full context, you will have to take my class! For those looking for an explanation of this third property of the Cantor Set, read on.

Continue reading Mathematical Musing: The Cantor Set is Uncountably Infinite: A Proof