Intermediate Algebra Assignment for 1/14, plus Test Warning

As we continue to explore the use of i to represent the square root of -1, and the consequences that such a definition involves, we revisited the topic of rationalizing today, and noted that since i is a square root, the rules of Simplest Radical Form require that we not leave i in the denominator of a fraction.

Our test on Unit 4 will be on Friday, January 18th. Please do not be absent on that day! If you know for some reason that you will be absent on that day, please arrange a time before the 18th to take the test! Otherwise, we will have to schedule a time for you to take the test during exam week.

Today’s Files

Cumulative IXL Modules

Intermediate Algebra Assignment for 1/4, plus Quiz Warning

Still more work with simplifying radical expressions today, now with expressions that include variable components. The method of dealing with these terms, fortunately, is fairly straightforward.

We will have a quiz on our work in this unit so far on Tuesday, January 8th.

Today’s Files

Cumulative IXL Modules

Intermediate Algebra Assignment for 1/3

Radical expressions aren’t just for undoing powers of two, there are in fact roots for every conceivable power you might use as an exponent. Our lesson today was evaluating “n-th” (pronounced “ennth”) roots.

Today’s Files

Cumulative IXL Modules

Intermediate Algebra Assignment for 1/2

We expanded on the specifics of Simplest Radical Form today by adding the requirement that expression written in SRF have no radical expressions in their denominator. The process of tweaking expressions to accomplish this is called rationalizing.

Today’s Files

Cumulative IXL Modules

Intermediate Algebra Assignment for 12/20

Yesterday we discussed adding/subtracting radicals (and a bit of dividing). Today is multiplying

Today’s Files

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Intermediate Algebra Assignment for 12/19

We have started Unit 4, a unit working extensively with radical expressions. We can treat these expressions as a class of numbers in their own way, with their own “rules” for adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing them. Today we started with adding/subtracting.

Today’s Files

Cumulative IXL Modules